Wood hauling day on the 12th

Okay, as everyone seemed to a) get plenty of wood, and b) enjoy themselves, there’ll be another wood hauling day planned in for Sunday, the 12th of this month.

Now that we’ve got a system sorted, I think we can get even more wood out of the gulley. Cliff the builder will be bringing the world’s cutest tractor to save the van’s clutch. With plenty of people, we can be hauling out pretty continuously.

So, who’s keen? And any suggestions for how to improve the experience for all?

90 thoughts on “Wood hauling day on the 12th

    1. I was hoping you’d be DJing…

      But yeah, I reckon that’s the way to go. Neighbours can’t object that much, considering a) we’re down in the gulley, and b) they’ve had their pick of firewood.

    2. I was hoping you’d be DJing…

      But yeah, I reckon that’s the way to go. Neighbours can’t object that much, considering a) we’re down in the gulley, and b) they’ve had their pick of firewood.

    1. More than none, you mean? But yeah, the only prob is the noise. Reckon it might be worth dragging big lumps up and chopping them by the road?

        1. Did the ‘two big wood screws and chains’ thing work ok for dragging big lumps?

          (I didn’t actually get to see any wood move at all, all day, coz I was in the van.)

          1. Me neither, cos I was swinging an axe.

            And I actually figured that since daily trailer hire is ~$50 and it’d probably be used by a bunch of people, we could figure out in advance how much each person needed to cough up.

            Given that half a cage trailer = about a cord of wood, $10 and a bit of time is a pretty sweet deal.

          2. Me neither, cos I was swinging an axe.

            And I actually figured that since daily trailer hire is ~$50 and it’d probably be used by a bunch of people, we could figure out in advance how much each person needed to cough up.

            Given that half a cage trailer = about a cord of wood, $10 and a bit of time is a pretty sweet deal.

        2. Did the ‘two big wood screws and chains’ thing work ok for dragging big lumps?

          (I didn’t actually get to see any wood move at all, all day, coz I was in the van.)

      1. Do you have electricity at the site? I love my little electric chain saw–sure, might sound silly, but very useful for this kind of work. (My lot has a lot of big tree-size hedges, etc.) Don’t have to leave it idling nor restart all the time. And it is quieter. Mine is a baby model, think they make them in various sizes.

        -B.

        1. Yup, lots quieter. We’ve tried before, but when you’ve got foot-plus thick slabs to get through, then a 14 inch electric chainsaw didn’t cut it, literally. Anything over three inches and it was having serious problems.

          I’d love it if they made downright huge electric saws, but two-strokes seem to have the market covered. I might see if I can get hold of the 80-cc, god-knows how many horsepower beast that I used a while back. That did the job.

          1. McCulloch Double Eagle chainsaw. Huge, loud, and nasty, but it got OMFG it got through wood.

            All of the rounds and slabs are cut across the grain, and it’s pinus radiata and macrocarpa, both of which split pretty easy with an axe or maul. You only really need the saw for the knotty bits, or for reducing down pieces that are just too heavy to move.

            So yeah, we’ve some big bits of wood…

          2. McCulloch Double Eagle chainsaw. Huge, loud, and nasty, but it got OMFG it got through wood.

            All of the rounds and slabs are cut across the grain, and it’s pinus radiata and macrocarpa, both of which split pretty easy with an axe or maul. You only really need the saw for the knotty bits, or for reducing down pieces that are just too heavy to move.

            So yeah, we’ve some big bits of wood…

        2. Yup, lots quieter. We’ve tried before, but when you’ve got foot-plus thick slabs to get through, then a 14 inch electric chainsaw didn’t cut it, literally. Anything over three inches and it was having serious problems.

          I’d love it if they made downright huge electric saws, but two-strokes seem to have the market covered. I might see if I can get hold of the 80-cc, god-knows how many horsepower beast that I used a while back. That did the job.

      2. Do you have electricity at the site? I love my little electric chain saw–sure, might sound silly, but very useful for this kind of work. (My lot has a lot of big tree-size hedges, etc.) Don’t have to leave it idling nor restart all the time. And it is quieter. Mine is a baby model, think they make them in various sizes.

        -B.

    2. More than none, you mean? But yeah, the only prob is the noise. Reckon it might be worth dragging big lumps up and chopping them by the road?

  1. I’d be up for that.

    I liked Mike’s suggestion of getting a delivery crew to run the trailer constantly.

    I would offer to bring more Easter Eggs but seeing that that is Easter Sunday, I suspect people who like such things will already be sick of them. 🙂

    1. Hmm… I don’t think the trailer didn’t spend that long being parked, but yup, we can try that. Loading it is easier/faster than loading cars, but I reckon we can do them too.

      How was the Transport Unit for moving wood? Seemed like a fair amount went in there.

    2. Hmm… I don’t think the trailer didn’t spend that long being parked, but yup, we can try that. Loading it is easier/faster than loading cars, but I reckon we can do them too.

      How was the Transport Unit for moving wood? Seemed like a fair amount went in there.

    3. bearing in mind that it will be necessary to have a driver (spending time away from the worksite) and a vehicle for the towing, and whoever is receiving the wood at their house should be unloading it. (or picking it up off their footpath later if they don’t have drive-on).

      if there is a lot of transporting to do with only one vehicle there is the issue of a day of heavy load on it, plus petrol which is not an insignificant consideration these days.

        1. Pretty well. I was thinking that the crew would be the driver + the person who lives at the place getting delivered to.

          I do take your point about wear/tear and petrol cost.

          1. There was talk of someone else hiring a trailer. If the van isn’t being used for hauling, then it can be loaded up and make drop-offs too.

            We did have a problem with running out of space in vehicles, with not all the wood being delivered on the day. However, there’s room to store wood up the slope (on the path or deck) if we need to. Getting it into bags and up the slope is the hard part, so I’d prefer to have plenty of people on that part of the job. But keen to hear people’s thoughts on this.

          2. There was talk of someone else hiring a trailer. If the van isn’t being used for hauling, then it can be loaded up and make drop-offs too.

            We did have a problem with running out of space in vehicles, with not all the wood being delivered on the day. However, there’s room to store wood up the slope (on the path or deck) if we need to. Getting it into bags and up the slope is the hard part, so I’d prefer to have plenty of people on that part of the job. But keen to hear people’s thoughts on this.

        2. Pretty well. I was thinking that the crew would be the driver + the person who lives at the place getting delivered to.

          I do take your point about wear/tear and petrol cost.

    4. bearing in mind that it will be necessary to have a driver (spending time away from the worksite) and a vehicle for the towing, and whoever is receiving the wood at their house should be unloading it. (or picking it up off their footpath later if they don’t have drive-on).

      if there is a lot of transporting to do with only one vehicle there is the issue of a day of heavy load on it, plus petrol which is not an insignificant consideration these days.

  2. I’d be up for that.

    I liked Mike’s suggestion of getting a delivery crew to run the trailer constantly.

    I would offer to bring more Easter Eggs but seeing that that is Easter Sunday, I suspect people who like such things will already be sick of them. 🙂

  3. how about a first shift of everyone throwing as many as possible of the existing small bits of wood off the pile into the bagging area, so that hauling can start straight off, giving the choppers time to get a pile started?

    also, a pallet leaned up under the path rail to allow the bag to be dragged over the edge easier

    and screw in the proud screw on the aluminium lip, as the rope consistently moved to where it is and rubbed on it

    also, set work times? i mean, if possible, something like 10 am start, hour first work, short tea break, 2 hours second work, shortish food break, 1 hour work, short tea break, work till finish, etc.

    1. I’m hoping to get up there this weekend for a bit and make a start on that pile.

      Pallet? Hmm, okay, will round one up.

      The aluminium lip is a pain, as the tube wall thickness isn’t that big. Hence there’s a fine line between having the screw heads proud and having them too deep and pushing through (as happened with one of the ends). An alternative plan might be just to move the aluminium along by ten centimeters to avoid just that screw. Did the rope sit in a fairly constant place?

      And yup, set work times. I’ll have to make up a rota to go on the noticeboard.

      Also, can I get the big pulley off you before the day? That means I can get the rope and all set up before 10 am so that we’re ready to go from the moment people get there.

      1. i have a pallet if you need it

        the rope stayed where the screw is for the first section of the drag, then moved towards the deck about 15-20cm for the second section of the drag.

        the screw looked like it had worked loose-ish, so I thought maybe a 1/4 or 1/2 turn would do it

        rota… can you arrange hooters so we know when to knock off?

        1. Pallets – Asian Food Warehouse on Donald Mclean St in Newtown, always have some and happy to get rid of them.

          As for the aluminium lip, I have a plan involving a new section, and screws that come in at an angle, not from the top of the piece, and so are out of the way of the rope. Reckon that might do the trick?

        2. Pallets – Asian Food Warehouse on Donald Mclean St in Newtown, always have some and happy to get rid of them.

          As for the aluminium lip, I have a plan involving a new section, and screws that come in at an angle, not from the top of the piece, and so are out of the way of the rope. Reckon that might do the trick?

      2. i have a pallet if you need it

        the rope stayed where the screw is for the first section of the drag, then moved towards the deck about 15-20cm for the second section of the drag.

        the screw looked like it had worked loose-ish, so I thought maybe a 1/4 or 1/2 turn would do it

        rota… can you arrange hooters so we know when to knock off?

    2. I’m hoping to get up there this weekend for a bit and make a start on that pile.

      Pallet? Hmm, okay, will round one up.

      The aluminium lip is a pain, as the tube wall thickness isn’t that big. Hence there’s a fine line between having the screw heads proud and having them too deep and pushing through (as happened with one of the ends). An alternative plan might be just to move the aluminium along by ten centimeters to avoid just that screw. Did the rope sit in a fairly constant place?

      And yup, set work times. I’ll have to make up a rota to go on the noticeboard.

      Also, can I get the big pulley off you before the day? That means I can get the rope and all set up before 10 am so that we’re ready to go from the moment people get there.

  4. how about a first shift of everyone throwing as many as possible of the existing small bits of wood off the pile into the bagging area, so that hauling can start straight off, giving the choppers time to get a pile started?

    also, a pallet leaned up under the path rail to allow the bag to be dragged over the edge easier

    and screw in the proud screw on the aluminium lip, as the rope consistently moved to where it is and rubbed on it

    also, set work times? i mean, if possible, something like 10 am start, hour first work, short tea break, 2 hours second work, shortish food break, 1 hour work, short tea break, work till finish, etc.

  5. On the trailer – that wee trailer is wee, and I need more wood than that. I was thinking of hiring a cage trailer for the day, and maybe hitching it to whichever car is towing to whichever place, saving the problem of loads of trailers trying to find parking space, and also that of ‘wear and tear’ – given that lots of vehicles have towballs.

    1. Two trailers beats one, I think.

      How do you want to be paid for that, given that other people will probably benefit from you stumping up the cash?

    2. Two trailers beats one, I think.

      How do you want to be paid for that, given that other people will probably benefit from you stumping up the cash?

    3. from that point of view, my trailer will fit on other people’s cars also, though it does not have a cage. it will just hold two “big scoops” from the firewood place at full well-stacked capacity without (much) wood rolling off onto the road, each “big scoop” is 1/3 cubic meter.

      1. Yup. I was thinking something along the lines of having big trailer for folks like me wot need lots, and smaller ones for folks like Rhi who has to carry said wood up lots of steps.

        However, if the Yellow Van is available for deliveries, that might reduce the need for hireage of a trailer at all.

      2. Yup. I was thinking something along the lines of having big trailer for folks like me wot need lots, and smaller ones for folks like Rhi who has to carry said wood up lots of steps.

        However, if the Yellow Van is available for deliveries, that might reduce the need for hireage of a trailer at all.

    4. from that point of view, my trailer will fit on other people’s cars also, though it does not have a cage. it will just hold two “big scoops” from the firewood place at full well-stacked capacity without (much) wood rolling off onto the road, each “big scoop” is 1/3 cubic meter.

  6. On the trailer – that wee trailer is wee, and I need more wood than that. I was thinking of hiring a cage trailer for the day, and maybe hitching it to whichever car is towing to whichever place, saving the problem of loads of trailers trying to find parking space, and also that of ‘wear and tear’ – given that lots of vehicles have towballs.

  7. Hi…I’m an acquaintance who you’ve met in passing at Fidel’s and various social events. Hopefully will vouch for me?

    Do you have a use and a few bags of wood for an additional volunteer? I’m one of Nature’s wusses, useless with a chainsaw/splitting. However, I can bag and shift cut wood until the cows come home. I could bring Delicious Sandwiches for noshing, and cardboard boxes for people to put wood in, and a few extra pairs of safety glasses.

    1. The more the merrier, I think. Ask for the address.

      There’s always the question of how much wood we get per extra person, and if that extra wood is enough for that person. The bottleneck is the wood hauling and that should be faster this time, using Cliffs tractor and easier slings to slip-knot onto the bags. Last time we had sixteen people and that might have been about the right number. Hell, we seem to be heading for at least that many this time, let’s give it a go, and see what happens.

      We’ll definitely up for sandwiches, cheers.

      1. Thanks so much! I don’t need tons/a trailer load of wood – every little bit means more warm nights. My ideal would be “one scoop”. I’ve got a Honda Civic for my own transport, so that limits me right there.

        Glad about the sandwiches. 16 – 18 people…working hard… Eight roast chicken; six bacon/cheese; six Gruyere cheese; all on grain bread with tomato and greens, sound good? Or should I plan a veganwich or three?

          1. Can do the roast chix sandwiches dairy-free, if that helps, and I will do my utmost to have veganwiches that are NOT hummus.

          2. Can do the roast chix sandwiches dairy-free, if that helps, and I will do my utmost to have veganwiches that are NOT hummus.

      2. Thanks so much! I don’t need tons/a trailer load of wood – every little bit means more warm nights. My ideal would be “one scoop”. I’ve got a Honda Civic for my own transport, so that limits me right there.

        Glad about the sandwiches. 16 – 18 people…working hard… Eight roast chicken; six bacon/cheese; six Gruyere cheese; all on grain bread with tomato and greens, sound good? Or should I plan a veganwich or three?

    2. The more the merrier, I think. Ask for the address.

      There’s always the question of how much wood we get per extra person, and if that extra wood is enough for that person. The bottleneck is the wood hauling and that should be faster this time, using Cliffs tractor and easier slings to slip-knot onto the bags. Last time we had sixteen people and that might have been about the right number. Hell, we seem to be heading for at least that many this time, let’s give it a go, and see what happens.

      We’ll definitely up for sandwiches, cheers.

  8. Hi…I’m an acquaintance who you’ve met in passing at Fidel’s and various social events. Hopefully will vouch for me?

    Do you have a use and a few bags of wood for an additional volunteer? I’m one of Nature’s wusses, useless with a chainsaw/splitting. However, I can bag and shift cut wood until the cows come home. I could bring Delicious Sandwiches for noshing, and cardboard boxes for people to put wood in, and a few extra pairs of safety glasses.

  9. Some of what he says rings true, some of it is clearly false, much of it just seems snarky and bitter – he’s probably an old media journalist fed up with people telling him to get with the program, and perhaps he’s decided the best way to leverage his snark and bitterness is to become a new media naysayer, and sell books and conference appearances about the perils of new media the way Clay Shirky sells books and conference appearances about the promise. But hey, doesn’t Nick Carr already have that job?

    One could, I suppose, write a book or a blog that gave a nuanced account of *both* promise and peril, delving into the (micro and macro) economics, challenging the prophets (of both salvation and doom), and doing some good honest number crunching and dataviz around the issues, but realistically speaking, would anyone read it, let alone talk about it? The sad reality is, polemicism *sells*, and to quote Jon Stewart, the reason you don’t hear so much from us moderates is, well, we got shit to do.

    Personally I am with Alan Kay when he says “the best way to predict the future is to invent it”. Once I get a better handle on moving from “invention” to “execution” I’m sure this approach will make a lot more sense…

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