Monthly progress

There’s been no house pics for nearly a month, but serious progress, so, pics for Africa!

We now have roofs:

Now the roofs and framing is up, we can almost claim to have rooms. The main living space runs from the two-storey trapeze space to the kitchen. Upstairs will have some internal walls, but till then you can look through all the bedrooms to the bathroom.

And there’s been further oiling of wood. This is weatherboards and uprights for the balustrade.

We have lots of wood.

Overall, it’s starting to look decidedly houseish.

There’s been minimal progress on anything else in my life, but:

Oh, and have a tuatara. This one was safely caged at Mt Bruce/Pukaha. For those of you not in NZ, these are vicious, grumpy, little bastards that move like lightning. They’re the curse of North Island trampers and many fingers have been lost to them. It’s too cold for them in the South Island, so trampers are only menaced by kea, the carnivourous, alpine parrots.

8 thoughts on “Monthly progress

  1. Deadly animals

    An unusually large tuatara took my entire right foot off last time I was out in the Orongorongo valley. Luckily my mate Trev was adept at sewing bits back together with flax.

    This, of course, is nothing to say for the most horrifying of all New Zealand fauna: The Great Spotted Kiwi. Many have been skewered with that long pointed beak and eaten alive to feed the production of those huge eggs that the females lay.

    Great Spotted Kiwis are the reason Māori invented the taiaha. I carry one with me on every hike.

      1. Re: Deadly animals

        Okay, I’m exaggerating, but only slightly. If it weren’t for my Patrickensis Snailskin boots he would have gone all the way through.

  2. Ah yes, you’ve got to watch those kea. One of them tried to lure a tramper friend over a cliff just to see what would happen :p.

    Look out for weka too. They go for the eyes.

    1. Yeah, but I was always told that it’s mainly the Stewart Island arboreal weka that put your eyes at risk, most of the mainland ones can’t reach. They can do some nasty damage to the backs of knees though.

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